Categories
Christian Living Prayer

Six Strings and a Prayer

“We live by faith, not by sight.” — 2 Corinthians 5:7 (NIV)

Once, when I was barely scraping by as an associate pastor, I asked God to help me find some money. I needed $300 fast, and the only way I knew to get it was to sell my beloved guitar. I told a local music shop owner my instrument was for sale, then restrung my guitar and polished it up. I sat it on a stand and prayed with true faith, “There it is, Lord…”

About five minutes later, the shop owner called. Someone was in his store looking for a guitar like mine! I brought my instrument to the shop and sold it to a gentleman on the spot for $400. The money was enough to cover my need, plus buy another guitar (less fancy, of course) to get me by.

God orchestrated the entire transaction!

As often happens here on Word Press, it was another blogger’s post that jogged my memory. Marie, from Blog with Marie, helped me remember a spiritual marker of my own.

She wrote about misplacing a heart shaped ring her mother gave her upon the birth of her first child. It wasn’t an expensive piece of jewelry, but held great sentimental value. Marie retraced her steps, praying to God all the while that He would show her where it was.

Did she find it? Click or tap over to her excellent post to find out!

Happy Friday ~ The Ring

I close with Marie’s parting thought–one that prompted this ENTIRE post:

“Have you had a similar experience where you asked the Lord to help you locate something and He has? How did it make you feel? I’d love to hear about your experience.”

Tag, kind reader. You’re it! Please share about a time when God came through for you.

🙏❤️ prayers and love.


Photo by Jessica Lewis on Pexels.com

https://davidsdailydose.org/2021/04/10/six-strings-and-a-prayer/

Categories
Christian Living resilience

The Young Buck on Baldy Mountain

It is in the quiet of the woods that I hear and feel God’s presence without distraction.

Cori Strathmeyer

The Space Between is a marvelous blog I discovered recently that focuses on experiencing God in the great outdoors. On the site, Cori reflects on faith, family, hiking, yoga and other life pauses.

Her April 3 post, Walking with God, is a true gem that brought back memories of hiking in the Sangre de Cristo mountains of northern New Mexico over 30 years ago.

What ignited my vivid recollection was the author’s statement, “Hiking is moving meditation: miles of opportunity for prayer and reflection on scripture.”


I spent the summer of 1988 working at a Christian conference center near Santa Fe, New Mexico. It was an exquisite setting, with huge conifers, cold water creeks and mountains in every direction. There were also dozens of alluring trails in the area. I became a compulsive day hiker.

After several beginner and intermediate treks, this young buck (me) yearned for a challenge. One of my braver hiking buddies suggested a 12.4 mile (out and back) route, in the nearby Pecos Wilderness Area, that was rated difficult. It started at a picturesque creek and ended near the 12,000 foot summit of Baldy Mountain–a 3,000 foot elevation gain.

Piece of cake, right?

Please stay with me, kind reader. I promise to come to a good biblical point.

We started at sun up. It was early July, but at 8,600 feet the temperature was in the upper 30’s. You could see your breath! I shivered under my thin sweatshirt as we meandered up the narrow, winding trail.

Stands of pine and spruce trees towered above us, hiding the view of the valley below. Just when it seemed we’d been swallowed by the forest, a window appeared.

Farther up the mountain, where the trees and the air grew thinner, the trail became steep. There were so many switch backs I lost all sense of direction.

Finally, the top of “Old Baldy” came into view. I took off my backpack, next to a crystal clear lake, and sat down. That’s when it hit: EXHAUSTION. The euphoria of reaching the trail’s end suddenly gave way to wilting fatigue. Despite being 20 years old, and in top physical shape, I could barely move.

I ate the 80’s equivalent of a Power Bar and laid back on my pack. “Dear God,” I prayed, “please help me get down this mountain.”

The view of the summit (taken while sitting on my backside).😊

The next thing I know my buddy kicked the sole of one my boots, “Wake up, Dave. We need to start back.” I’d been asleep for an hour!

Thank God, I was able to stand. My strength had returned! Getting down the mountain turned out to be much easier than getting up it. This provided a fine opportunity for meditation on the move.

Have you ever had an experience that lined up with scripture word for word?

“Even those who are young grow weak; young men can fall exhausted. But those who trust in the Lord for help will find their strength renewed.” — Isaiah 40:30-31 (GNT)

It’s deceptively easy to walk up a mountain–for real, or metaphorically–only to find yourself exhausted.

Jesus gets it…

“Come to me. Get away with me and you’ll recover your life. I’ll show you how to take a real rest. Walk with me and work with me—watch how I do it. Learn the unforced rhythms of grace. I won’t lay anything heavy or ill-fitting on you. Keep company with me and you’ll learn to live freely and lightly.” — Matthew 11:28-30 (MSG)

Rest, THEN get back on the trail.


https://davidsdailydose.org/2021/04/05/the-young-buck-on-baldy-mountain/

Categories
Christian Living Motivation

Life’s Not Fair. So Now What?

Disheartening axioms that include no remedy are annoying.😫

Life’s not fair.

So what should we do?

  • Hold our noses and take it?
  • Get liquored up and not care?
  • Turn to a life of clandestine crime against the “bad guys?”

None of these are healthy choices.

Here’s an idea: since life’s not fair, make it fairer.

Now, that’s a possible remedy!

Yes, it’s a tall order, but wonderfully anticipatory. It reminds me of my favorite quote by Martin Luther King, Jr., “Never look for justice, but never cease to give it.”

After all, according to 1 Peter 2:9, “We are a chosen people, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people belonging to God, that we may declare the praises of Him who called us out of darkness into His wonderful light.”

We’re torch bearers, not Twinkies in the rain!

The 13th century Persian poet, Rumi, is one of my favorite torch bearer types. No, he wasn’t a Christian, but he’s right about how to make life more decent.

Be a lamp, or a lifeboat, or a ladder. Help someone’s soul heal. Walk out of your house like a shepherd.

Rumi

Next to his quote in my journal I wrote, “A Royal Priest for God – 1 Peter 2:9.”

So what’s the job description for a Royal Priest? I found it in the Old Testament book of Micah–three things we can do to make life fairer.

“He has shown you, O man, what is good. And what does the Lord require of you? To act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God.” – Micah 6:8 (NIV)

  • Act Justly – always do right by others. Right = what God would do.
  • Love Mercy – be kinder than is necessary.
  • Walk Humbly with God – He’s the Savior. It’s not about us.

If enough of God’s people consistently did these things, it could make the world a better place.

My father, a math teacher, used to say, “Life is like arithmetic. In any given situation people either add, subtract, multiply or divide.”

Sounds like a plan! We should at LEAST add to the quality of life around us, and make it our goal to multiply.

One more thought from my man, Rumi:

“Wherever you stand, be the soul of that place”

Make life fairer


Photo by Karolina Grabowska on Pexels.com