The Sky is Probably NOT Falling

“Whoever seeks good finds favor, but evil comes to one who searches for it.”

Proverbs 11:27

In the early 1990’s, social psychologist Roy Baumeister began exploring the negativity bias–the widely accepted belief that bad has a stronger impact on people than good. His team conducted extensive research, hoping to find situations where a single positive circumstance was actually stronger than a negative one.

They couldn’t find any.

In fact, Baumeister and his colleagues discovered that negative life events are typically three to five times stronger than positive ones. In other words, it takes four compliments to make up for one put down.

He lays it all out in his 2019 book, The Power of Bad.

Here’s my favorite take away: our brains are hard-wired to focus on bad, but the rational mind can take this in stride by finding the good.

Baumeister recommends a positivity ratio of 4 to 1 (4 good to 1 bad).

Finding the good isn’t a new idea; it’s as least as old as the 1913 novel, Pollyanna. In the book, a young orphan named Pollyanna uses the “glad game” to cope with the circumstances and sorrows of her life.

Here’s how to play:

Always look for something to be glad about in any situation.

This makes sense. Maybe it’s why gratitude journals are so popular, while keeping an ingratitude journal is a non-starter.

But let’s take it all the way back to the first century. The apostle Paul reminded the Christians in Rome that God uses EVERYTHING for the good of those who love and serve Him (Romans 8:28).

“Child, I got this. It’s ALL good.”

God

Finally, brothers, Whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things.

Philippians 4:8

https://davidsdailydose.org/2020/05/23/the-sky-is-probably-not-falling/

God Doesn’t Break Toys

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

The little boy in my music class pounded the tambourine on the floor. This was AFTER I’d demonstrated to everyone how to properly play our classroom instruments. Visibly frustrated, I confiscated the instrument and commented (in jest): “If you break this tambourine, I’m going to come to your house and break one of your toys.” The offender gazed at me blankly. However, another little boy nearby spoke up matter of factly,

“God doesn’t do bad things. He doesn’t break toys.”

Five Year Old Super Sage

OUCH! My young friend had me there. I sheepishly admitted to everyone that he was right and I was wrong.

Even a shallow dive into the Bible, reveals that God is fair in his dealings with people (Psalm 89:14). Furthermore, He is loving (1 John 4:8), patient (Exodus 34:6), and merciful to the max (Lamentations 3:22,23).

“And the point is?”

God is indeed good, but we are prone to blame Him for the evils that touch us personally. For example, I have a friend who lost faith in God after her father died during a routine medical procedure. She feels her dad’s life was taken; how could a loving God allow this?

Truly, this is a tragic situation, but is God REALLY to blame? Perhaps it makes more sense for my friend not to believe in doctors.

With due respect to those who grieve (that’s all of us at some point), aren’t good and bad simply two sides of the same coin?

“Shall we accept good from God and not trouble?”

Job 2:10b

In the quest of making life’s music, there is going to be a broken tambourine or two. Perhaps our goal should be to recognize (that for most of us) our lives contain more lemonade than lemons.