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Christian Living sacrifice

A Different Kind of Hero

When his younger brother went off to war in 1942, my grandfather, a bookkeeper, became a reluctant cotton farmer. Their dad was unable to manage 160 acres by himself. So Raymond, my grandfather, came back home to help.

Trading ledger books for leather gloves doesn’t sound like that big of a deal. But PaPaw, as we called him, had a weakened heart–caused by a childhood bout with rheumatic fever. He was well into his sixties by the time I remember him. But, even as a boy, it was clear to me that Papaw had never been a “he man.”

Yet, like so many of his generation, he made big sacrifices for the good of others. And that makes this little 135 pound guy my hero. Sound like anyone else you know?

Photo by Patricia McCarty on Pexels.com

In your relationships with one another, have the same mindset as Christ Jesus.

Philippians 2:5

Recently, Jeff King caused me to ponder what makes a real hero with his post, Quote for 10/11/21. “When we talk about heroes we think of someone elevated, a marble statue on a pedestal.” Jeff goes on to say that actual heroism is often less statuesque. Many who inspire us by their selfless acts are “misshapen,” (Jeff’s word) by their circumstances.

And like a good Christian blogger, he backs up his thoughts with scripture, highlighting the process every hero endures. “Not only so, but we also rejoice in our sufferings, because we know that suffering produces perseverance; perseverance, character; and character, hope.” –Romans 5:3-4 (NIV)

For some reason, I’ve always thought of this biblical purification process–from suffering to hope–as a one time deal. But Jeff’s post made me realize it’s actually a repeating cycle.

Caution: for best results, load this type of washing machine evenly. Overloading can lead to life imbalances. It also makes quite a racket!😊

Here’s my favorite hero spin cycle scripture. Please share one of yours!

“Make a careful exploration of who you are and the work you have been given, and then sink yourself into that. Don’t be impressed with yourself. Don’t compare yourself with others. Each of you must take responsibility for doing the creative best you can with your own life.“ —Galatians 3:4-5 (MSG)

🙏❤️ prayers and love.

By davidsdailydose

I'm just a regular guy who was
tempted to lose all hope but did not. It was God who made the difference.

45 replies on “A Different Kind of Hero”

I think your Papaw defines a true hero. The fact that he traded in ledger books for gloves, showed his selfless love and willingness to step in and help…a humble man doing what he knew needed to be done. As to the the wash cycle? Perfect! God bless!

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Thank you for your comment. I keep a picture of my Papaw on a bookshelf. Sometimes, I look at it to remind myself what a real man is. My grandfather truly was a humble man; he proved it by his actions over a long stretch of time. Blessings to you in your blog ministry!

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David, what stood out for me was the humility of your Pawpaw. He did not consider his desires but gave his life for his father on the farm and served others. The spirit cycle illustration is a good one.

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Thank you for your comment. I’ve never thought of my grandfather as a wounded healer, but he most certainly was. People who persevere in their suffering create opportunities for others to connect with them. You’ve given me a spark for a new idea! People are like legos: we are designed to connect with each other. Blessings!

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It’s true: “Many who inspire us by their selfless acts are “misshapen” by their circumstances.” We may be in awe of people who achieve high and lofty things; but often they seem to live in a different world from us. The people who truly motivate us, and help inspire us to persevere, are those who have suffered (just like us), and yet are in a different place today. A better place. A place we’d like to be. Thanks for another thought-provoking post.

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Thank you, Pete. As so often happens, other bloggers often inspire me to spin-up (pun intended) another angle from their story. This has happened a few times with you. Iron truly does sharpen iron! Thank you for reading and commenting. Blessings!

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You’re welcome, brother Alan. My “Hugh” was a Baptist deacon named Orville Lambert who volunteered to work with the youth of our church. He had to be in his seventies at the time. But he taught Sunday school to a bunch of “know-it-all” teens. By the end of the year, we hung on his every word. I still remember some of the scripture verses he had us memorize. Thank you for sharing your story. Blessings!

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This post reminds me of some of my heroes of the faith, but the one that was foremost in my thoughts was a wee man called Hugh Keirs from Cowdenbeath. He wasn’t startling to look at or had a booming voice but he was on fire for the Gospel, dedicating his retirement often on his own sharing the Good News door to door all over Fife. Few remember Hugh but I am sure God has him in His hand. Thank you David for reminding me of this dear brother, God bless you.

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Thanks, Scribelady! My mother, Papaw’s daughter, told me he rarely pulled cotton with the rest of the family. But he plowed the fields, drove the cotton to the gin, and did other things that didn’t involve hard physical labor. But, like you surmised, sometimes he had no choice. There was still bookkeeping to do on the farm, but I’m sure he missed his days as a number cruncher at a busy West Texas auto dealership. Thank you for your input. Blessings!

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Thanks, Bridget. I suppose every older generation looks aghast at the younger ones coming up next. But it does seem like we have far fewer these days who are willing to make sacrifices for the good of others. Your scripture reference is spot on. We give it our best shot, because, in the end, we’re working for the Lord anyhow. Blessings!

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I admire your grandfather for leaving what he enjoyed doing to work on the farm. Many career books urge people to go after what they want to do and stick with it–that’s how to “get ahead”, right? The books don’t mention life can hand you different circumstances. I shudder to think how physically hard that must have been to work on the farm with a weakened heart. I also think of how emotionally hard that must have been–but he did it. He did what was necessary to do. In a sense, he “laid aside his life” for the good of others.

I got a chuckle out of your washing machine illustration, but your point was made. Once again you prove a drawing doesn’t need to be elaborate to get the point across.

I can’t think of any verse, but I agree with Beth, that I like the way The Message words Gal.3:4,5.

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Great post! Thank you for sharing about your grandfather. It is sad the “heroes” that the young ones look up to these days. But the world still has some true heroes, those who do for others, work hard, and have integrity. Colossians 3:23 comes to mind. “Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for human masters.”

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Ah, yes. The genuineness of our faith refined by fire. The 1 Peter passage definitely describes the same process as Romans 5:3-4. I recently learned that the motto on the Duncan Clan family crest (back in Scotland) says, “Learn to Suffer.” Being a Duncan myself, this somewhat fits my experience. It’s not that I want to experience suffering, but I don’t want to stay the same way either. I appreciate your thoughts, Beth. 🐾 Doggie hugs to Adi and Summer.🐾

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Great spin cycle illustration David. It gives a visual that drives home that we come out better for having gone through the suffering. I like how the Message worded Galatians 3:4-5. One of my favorite spin cycle verses is 1 Peter 1: 6-7.

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I agree, Manette Kay! Of course, Jesus personified the beatitudes. But it’s also possible to find friends of His who do so as well. For instance, the thought, “blessed are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted.” You, my friend, embody this beatitude. Thank you for reading and commenting. Blessings!

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Well said, Barb! My Papaw was truly a selfless person. He liked working with numbers and reading book after book, but he farmed too, because that was what was needed. He was the oldest child, and I believe he felt the burden to take care of things intensely. Thanks for stopping by! Have a blessed weekend.

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Thank you, Betty. I like your quote! Life really is a matter of perspective. And keeping a positive one, most of the time, really helps smooth out the road. My dad used to tell me, “Son, if you were a professional you’d be on television.” Yet another, “Don’t take yourself too seriously,” quote. Jeff is one of my favorite bloggers. Like you, he doesn’t waste words and he always has something interesting to say. Thanks again for reading and commenting.

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David, I can’t improve on the verse in your post, especially with the word “creative” in it. The verse reminds me of another quote I heard recently, “Don’t let success go to your head, and don’t let failure go to your heart.” (The part about don’t be impressed with yourself.) Also, I agree with SimplyB’s comment – your posts are always so good. And… I checked out and followed Jeff King’s blog. I had to smile at his byline. Our world today truly needs more real heroes. Enjoy your day!

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Great post and love the spin cycle illustration David. It’s a bit like a bicycle wheel because we are always moving, growing if we stay doing it. one of my many life time verses apply here. “And whatever you do, whether in word or deed, do it all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him”. Colossians 3;17

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Iron sharpens iron, brother! The blog-o-sphere is a better place with you in it.❤️ Spiritual sparks often fly when I read your posts. I just have to slow down long enough to catch them–before they hit the ground. A great weekend to you as well!

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I’m glad we found each other, SimplyB! Have you been posting? I remember clicking “follow,” but haven’t seen anything from you in awhile. If you haven’t been writing, just put something out there! We need to hear your perspective. Blessings!

PS. Checking out the Ephesians passage now…

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I’m really grateful God led me to your blog. Always so good. Really love the “spin cycle” analogy and your graphic. All of Paul’s writings are quite direct and instructional. My scripture reading this morning took me to Ephesians 4. From verse 17 on is labeled ” The Way You Should Live” in the NCV version. Love it. Pretty much a many-verse spin cycle. Thanks for sharing your heart today and have a blessed weekend.

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You’re right, Rainer! The Beatitudes are like a mini-lecture on real heroism in leadership. I once heard a sermon where the pastor called them the “beautiful attitudes.” Blessings to you and Sweet T. Enjoy your weekend!

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Thank you for sharing, Manu. Your scripture verse goes perfectly with my post! When I thought of overloading the hero washing machine, I thought of myself camping out too long on the character side. None of my friends would want to be around me!

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This is one of the verses I remember.
2 Corinthians 14:7 “For our light and momentary troubles are achieving for us an eternal glory that far outweighs them all.”
Laughed at the loading of the machine evenly otherwise it leads to life imbalance- funny but true 🙂

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I think we have a distorted view of heroes. I’m currently studying the Beatitudes, and in reading your post and Jeff King’s post you mentioned in your post, I think the Beatitudes paint a picture of what a hero looks like in Biblical terms. Good post, brother. Gave me food for thought.

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